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20121113
20121113
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scenes from that part of california. he took us down there and proudly showed us her work. although he traveled the world his family was always in his thoughts. california was always his home. what i will most remember about chris is how thoughtful he was and how people were drawn to him. chancellor wu wrote when chris was appointed ambassador, friends, professional acquaintances contacted me to encourage me to reach out to him. he was so well thought of. i sent a hand-written card and to my surprise he returned the correspondence with his own handwritten note. that would be very much like chris. he appreciated and enjoyed interactions with people. in fact, our friend chris highland put it very eloquently when he said, chris was the finest among us. more than his obviously charms, he was a man of substance and humility. at parties, dinners and gatherings he spent little times talking about himself and his accomplishments. only when he was forced to. instead he asked people about their lives, their views, their accomplishments. he always focused on ther people rather than himself. this
. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looking at why this building came to be, in many ways it also included mayor gavin newsome, particularly, who really had an affection for this building. he saw the design. he saw the potential. he wanted to make sure that that building got built. and he said, do what you need to do, but please, if you can make that building work, we need to have that building in civic center. >> i happened to be at a green conference santa clara. he said you shouldn't cancel that project. can you work with us? mic
in the association. i think concerning this item, it is important for me and all of us to recognize there are ballot points of view. if we're serious about developing solutions that work for all of us, we have to entertain those points of view and tried to reach consensus. that is the only one that we will create a workable, sustainable solutions. all we're doing is spinning our wheels. my reason for being here is because i truly have come to the conclusion that it is not only based on years on the ground operationally but years of working on development of public policy, working with state governments and justice and lower in corp. -- incarceration and working with other people. a variety of settings. i do not believe that incarceration has taken us where we need to be. i believe the war on drugs has been a failure. when we institutionalize people over extended periods of time, we take low-level offenders in the early stages and harden them and we send them to the university of crime. by the time they get out of prison, they become a bigger social problem. where i come from, whether it is the [unin
lacked this ability that most of us take for granted, that is how they feel. hopefully, i did giving you a touch of a psychopathy for a nanosecond. how do we study people like him? we can transport him out from the present to the hospital. one of the things my lab does, we built a really nice trailer in new mexico. here is my trailer. i live in a trailer in mexico. [laughter] this trailer has a really nice mri in it. we work with inmates to volunteer force studies and how to make them better. what we have found is that individuals to have those psychopathic traits, only about a third of all inmates will score really high on the straights. they have reduced gray matter density in these areas. this is the same area where that guy had the tumor. these individuals, control and for all the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to an
with the back of my hand. i said use all 10 fingers, i'll buy you breakfast. checkpoint, security, two. i survived the situation, got on the plane. the point is this, that what's in my head i've never had to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession unde
rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behaviors that fall under expulsion and suspending and when talking to administrators and their policies he found it helpful to speak of these terms in termses of behaviors and rather than saying we're criminalizing you and the think language is also important and i want to thank you for bringing up that point. it's something that i really advocate for and our caution to use zero tolerance and exclusionary discipline policies and also i teach teachers at san jose state and hundred students who are future teachers. >> can they do a projector? >> no. my teacher did, but again using social media, integrating all of the areas is so important for the prevention.
that almost 1 in 10 americans struggle with a substance use disorder and that about 1 in 5 americans has a mental health problem. treatment and recovery are the pathway forward for these individuals, a pathway that leads to improved family relationships, health and well-being, hope for the future, and purpose in the sustainment of their recovery. as we hear and see their stories, we learn that recovery happens through many different pathways and that, in every marked by care, acceptance, and respect. this year marks the 22nd year of recovery month , and this year we have broadened it to incorporate recovery from mental health problems along with substance use disorders. recovery should be the common goal, whether one is dealing with mental or substance use disorders, or both. i encourage you to visit recoverymonth.gov to learn more about the celebrations, events, and the 2011 theme: join the voices for recovery. recovery benefits everyone. this is an important effort, to try to make sure that we put the light on recovery from substance abuse and mental illnesses. for the first time, we'v
all of us that this is sacred ground. the people who came before most of us, the native people who came before us believed that this ground was sacred and no one is an owner. we are stewards of this ground. the dirt that you are going to play in and plant in is the legacy that those people have left us. it's really appropriate, i think that we have gone to all corners of the city. we have gone east and south and west and we conclude here in the invite you to join us back at tent and catherine is waving her arm where's you can join us in the north beach campaign. we have john briscoe, our honorary chair, who will lead that along with our board of directors, camilla, john. steven. carol goodman. we have haven't done this alone. i would like to quickly acknowledge our partnership organizations. friends of joe dimaggio, russian river, the committee for better parks and recreation for north beach, the community youth center, telegraph hill center. sherman elementary. the francisco middle school pto. states peter and paul school. john parker elementary and garfield elementary and thank y
at bowdoin college in maine and as we shared the stories with each us and we realized we loved our college in similar ways. he also reminded me of things i liked about it and many of you know milton is a peaceful man. one not to involve himself in very strong out bursts but you knew his passion was always behind everything that he did, and of course those years later when i became the public works director we engaged again as he was working with the friends of the urban forest and reminding me "you don't cut the trees down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore an
are set by m-o-us. [speaker not understood] so, we don't have control over everything. for the things that we do control, cost containment is an important objective. i don't think we should tie our hands and say that it will have to be flat. there may be good and sufficient reasons that we have to go above that. but if we do, we need to explain why. what those requirements were, how it calculates to an impact on the rates, and why that is a necessary thing for us to do. and there was basically nothing else we could do to offset those costs some other way, that we owe it to ourselves, we owe it to our rate payers that we make that kind of a finding. so, i think that's a very valuable addition. i'm sorry? >> where would you place the language? >> i think inserting that after the sustainability paragraph right before the report card might be addition emphasis as we're doing that report card. it can go many places. * additional >> it's meant to conform with the general structure and exactly where it goes -- >> we'll figure it out. >> yeah, i would leave staff to figure it out. >> mr. pre
will be back. >> all right. our next scene is going to move us from story telling that took place during the hindu temples and india into the mogel time in india this come from hindu and western cultures brought together. when the mogels came from persia to north india they saw the story telling and thought it was a beautiful art form. they were not engaged with the story but saw the beauty in the footwork and hand movement. they brought the dancers into their courts. they were a form of entertainment. so, i want you to put your imagination caps on. we will go from the forest into a beautiful mogel palace. there are velvet carpets and peacocks walking around. there are beautiful paintings and everyone all of you, the audience have come to enjoy the court and the king sits on his thrown in the corner twirling his mustache and he called for his dancers and they come to the room. you are here to be entertained by them. this is called taught. taught is a highly stylized tuning of the mind and body together. you will see very fast turns ending in sharp stances and things with our eyes and eye
that are difrplt than us, but we are all equal. the third one is working together and i think about the giants, we're all for the team, not all together not as if we are color blind and color doesn't exist but with our diversity. the fourth is with power and authority, the person who stands up and says this is what needs to happen, like a school principal who says we're not going to let kids go around the school saying that's okay, all these things are needed. >> i like that, that's great. something that really resonated with me that tom said, if you simply tolerate diversity you are aspiring to mediocrity. can you talk about the ambassadors, adults taking an active role to intervene when we witness bullying. >> all of us are humbled by the virus, how systemic it's become. how do you get your hands around that? for me it's top down and bottom up. we are authority figures and what we do for our children and that's care, but we need to empower them to become the leaders they are waiting to become. this notion of youth adult partnership is esoteric in its term but on the ground how do you operatio
is actually down in recent years. his colleague have actually stopped using the term of "bullying" and refer to peer aggression and i can go into definitions but i won't bore you. a subset of bullying is also not on the rise and based on researchers and their samples and other scholar's work and 20% of teens have ever experienced cyber bullying and a scholar from norway published lower numbers but why be such a stickler about accurate data? because the norms for research say getting the facts out takes the tacit acceptance or fatalism out of the picture. perception changes behavior so when we connect surveys in school and own their own data and a psychology professor at university of nebraska and the vast majority of students moment engage in bullying behavior and when students find that out bullying behavior goes down further and it's a powerful resource you can use. now i'm going to introduce this amazing panel. first we have just to my right mia from sealtion. she is going to explain more about this term that was used a lot today and social literacy or social emotional learning. ali
and are going to have treatment. i also agree with tal, not necessarily everybody that uses drugs is an addict, and not necessarily everybody who uses drugs needs to have treatment. but having said that, people that we often come in contact with will be people who have a severe drug abuse problem and generally they also have a mental health issue problem, there are often housing problems, employment, many other problems, and that's the population we deal with often. and i think that figuring a way to have an intervention so that services are available for those that need it i think is really important. i don't necessarily agree a felony conviction is the vehicle to do so, but i think we have to make sure that as we lower the sanctions here, that we do have the tools and that we have the ability to distinguish between people that have a drug addiction problem, people that are using drugs recreationally and otherwise are a functional person. >> we're going to be taking audience questions shortly, so if you have a question, just try to get the attention of someone in the aisles. ethan, let me ask
, in the joint meeting, and also to allow us to go forward with the communications consultant, our contractor. then in the first quarter of next year, we expect we will be surveying -- conducting our third citywide survey of prospective customers. we will then be presenting to you our adopted not to exceed rates, asking you to adopt -- excuse me, the not to exceed rates for the program in february. then that will start under the rate requirements, that will start the 30 day clock, where the board of supervisors will then have an opportunity to consider their comfort with those not-to-exceed rates. and then by mid-march, we'll know if we have a program offering that the policy-makers agree is affordable to san franciscans. then in the second quarter, we'll begin that early notification effort that i mentioned. and we'll be coming to the commission in june to ask each of you to review the findings of the customer survey of our early notification efforts, and authorize mr. kelly to sign the shell energy north america master agreement. by the third quarter of 2013, we should be -- we should have
, the competitor. the other thing i didn't get to talk in the previous item that was alarming to us right now what staff is telling us is that their intention is to always have the commercial customers be an opt in. and in mirren they did not do it that way. they included commercial customers recently in their full opt out process. in san francisco most of the energy is used by commercial customers. we will not be able to achieve that big beautiful build-out that we're planning without those commercial customers being put into an opt out so enough of them stay in to get the bonding ability and the economies of scale to make sure that we can do the full build out and hire the thousands of people, et cetera. thanks. >> you said that marin opt in? >> no, marin, they did their initial thing a couple of years ago. they just completed their enrollment and enrolled all of their customers a few months ago, and that included commercial customers who were then able to opt out if they wanted to. but they enrolled everybody. and i know that -- yes. >> president torres: okay. have any further comments? no? mot
there are 24 of these that have been completed with this one, and the proper use of our library bonds program from beginning from the year 2000 with the great partnership of dpw and so forth. there are more great partnerships to be guilt because guess what we're doing with the bonds that publicly improves, we're honoring these kids' future. this is a place where there is going to be invent, sharing, yes, exploring, meeting, oh, gosh, what else did we miss? >> meeting. >> instructor: yes, meeting and sharing and exploring and inventing and reading. of course. we're just going to have so much of this and i'm so happy to be working with the supervisors who also know this. because we're working together on things that you believe in. and i'm waiting for the chance, when board president chiu and scott wiener have their kids and when they come to north beach branch library, they will remember this day, when they bring their kids up to the front and say mayor lee and luis herrera and everybody worked together to get this done. and, by the way, more is to come when we all work together. because to
this regional commitment and that's what's before us now. the carpenters that show up today, they're not necessarily from the san francisco local. that's local 22. that's pat mull i began. -- mulligan. i was negotiating for 261 members who live in marin county. so, we've always been kind of confronted with this what's good for san francisco versus what's good for working people in general. and i'm sensitive to that. we support local hires, for example, to the detriment of the union members that live outside of this county. those union members that live in san mateo county and those union members that live in marin county. the item before us, i see is slated to go before the san francisco board of supervisors. those officials, they don't have those same concerns. they solely represent or concern themselves with the plight of working people who live here in this town. that is why i'm inclined to move this item along for their consideration. because while i always love to see a whole bunch of big strong working guys in a room, i think the conversation probably is better had over ther
. there is no application fee. if you are interested in an application or information, i have brochures, or you can give us a call. >> thank you. next is marked with wells fargo. >> hello, i work for wells fargo bank. i cover the northern california region. i usually focus on about $350 -- $350,000 of sbe loans. last year, for 2010, i did 43 loans. so we are lending. i usually focus on six different types of loans. start-ups, business acquisitions, real estate purchases with ti's, working capital, a partner buyouts, business expansion. when i am looking at a potential loan, i use the standard five c's of credit. the first one is character. what we are looking for is a minimum score around 640. we would like to say no recent bankruptcy foreclosures, bankruptcies, tax liens. if we see a loan that has been modified, we would like to see a reason it was modified, what ever reason it may be. it cannot be, i did not want to pay that payment any more. the second c, conditions. basically, how precise will the money be used? we are looking at a business plan. when you look at a business plan, that is just a start u
time and i used to work at the presidio. so, we have a lot to do, especially with the sewer system improvement project. and we discussed a lot about the water system improvement project. and y'all have in this chambers listened to a lot of people from the city and county of san francisco, including a lot of members of the community, disadvantaged members who have come here and spoken to you all and asked your help. so, i think having a chair with a lot of his legislative experience, having a union person who should fully understand what our city needs, and who should focus on helping our community, especially creating career jobs because we hear a lot, we hear a lot from the heads of departments. we hear a lot from the mayor. we hear a lot from the mayor's office of economic development and work force. but i would say the san francisco public utilities commission, because you are an enterprise department, you all have a little more clout to do things in a better way and to fulfill the aspirations of those who have come here again and again and again asking for help. so, i wish you
that he understood that we have term limits for life as well, but how easy is it for all of us to life life so easily without thought or recognition that is time limited. if you look at the life of milton marks you know with certainty he understood there wasn't a day or moment to waste because the click is ticking on his tragically too short life. i would like to close with a hebrew prayer which is said at times of joyful occasions, but i think might necessarily have greater meaning at times of painful transition because of course life isn't life without the joy, without the sorrow ." (speaking hebrew). >> blessed as you and krawt creator and sustained us and brought us to this time and place. thank you. [applause] >> please welcome henny kelly, milton -- among many other things and milton's first grade teacher -- no, no. do i have that wrong? okay. thanks. >> i need to tell you that there was a mistake in his biography. among the schools that milton went to he also went to presidio where he was my student. his mother knew that if you were in politics in this city you should go
understanding where it's coming from, talking about a culture or a community, that's what they are used to. you tell people not to do that but as a child all you've heard is negativity and you've been beat up on and they talk bad to you. it's not just from one workshop you are going to change the mindset, how do we understand the mentality. the other is understanding the online/offline. we had alonzo coming in and speaking to us, they don't understand the impact, it's not enough for me to say we're going to do a workshop or a campaign, a poster thing, it's really about how do we change the culture of a community and a people and it's not just a one-off. >> what does it take? >> the thing about changing the environment again, changing the social norms, it helps to understand there are primarily about 5 different ways we can influence and warm the climate of a school or community, students being one, families and parents, staff, policies and young people themselves. if we can understand that strategickly, sort of get down out of the big conversation and look at ways how do we, as you said, educ
, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you are working for apple or ibm. you can move from a regular employee to ceo. in the black community, it is not like this. it is not structured like that. there is no one at sagging or telling you how to operate. there is a term in the black community called a one-man army. it is someone who acts alone. he did not bring anybody with them, he is called a one-man army. he does not have to report to anybody. none of that. i do not know if that is worse than a hierarchy. at the end of the day, i mean, it is not a gang. it is a community. i know that i am not going to get the word again abolished from the media, but i want to clarify. as long as you keep putting a label on
esexcavated. it has dried out allows us to achieve a bigger production rate. we can see more groundwater inflows, but overall i'm very pleased with our moving there. on the bay tunnel, 90% of the tunnel has been excavated now. the total boring machine did cross all the levies. the last levies under the salt ponds on east bay without impact to the surface so we're pleased with that. what you see on the right side is the receiving shaft in newark. so work there has progressed very well. and if all goes according to plan we could be achieving break through -- hole-through rather early in 2013 and this of course would be a major -- is going to be a major milestone for us. now, the remaining slides deal with calaveras. this is a slide that you've seen before. i've used it several times to explain the unforeseen, unexpected subsurface conditions that were observed at observation hill. about a month ago or so, the commission asked staff to provide more details on the steps that are being taken in the resources and expertise being brought in to address these challenging commissions. i think comm
content to us that is inappropriate, but we have since invested a lot of time and energy on things like social resolutions. how do you create a culture where people can report problems to each other? which i will talk about in a second, so cue up the next slide. >> dave, can i interrupt for a second? one of the things that i noticed they think is really important for people in the school space and probably law enforcement to remember is that social media platforms whatever it is and you name it -- what? a million apps for the mobile platform alone. those are not the context of bullying. school life, school, peer life, peer relations. that's the concept of bullying whether it's bullying or cyber bullying and this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an a
's almost like with teachers and we used to call it in servicing, a lot of people think you wouldn't want to go to an in service. teachers are always hungry for stuff. i believe in the law enforcement community and the other convenient tues we're talking about, they are already there. they got the itch. with some leadership from the community or a faith organization or a parent i think it will actualize. >> the sunnyvale safety and police department have been really spectacular and have spearheaded this with officer holly lawrence. she has the program, it's in place, we call it train the trainer where we train other police officers to take it back to their counties. it's a spectacular program and is available now. >> so we don't have to wait. >> a good thing about the digital age is we're going to take some of the best practices, we're going to make it available. you get school officials to think how does this fit into the queue of things i did and should be doing, tlau our web site, focus of expertise and other places, indicate what are those programs that work that help students und
away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when they cuss you out in the classroom or the hallway. i was in chicago in may and already the strike talk was coming up and talking to some of the teacher. one of the teachers said i don't know what to do about this bullying thing because the kids are cussing me out in the hallway and all i can do is write them up. i think that's a moment i'd like us to think about in terms of empowerment of the teacher. it might be the case that the teacher doesn't feel for a lot of different reasons that she can't depend on his principal to back her up and maybe that principal their best, too. but one of the things i want us it look at in terms of treating children with dignity, which means they are worthy, two things. respect as a word is overused in schools and if i could frankly take down all of the banners of in schools that say you have to respect yourselves, i would. because i think that kids see that and
that a vikings punter sent. that's where we also get into u.s. history and this is where we get into core rur can urriculum. this is about freedom of speech, it makes it relevant, it goes right into something that kids are already seen on espn so they are already primed to talk about it. that's the kind of stuff i think we need to be looking at so we get this bullying stuff out of their head and they see relevance instead. >> anyone want to take some questions? i want to start with a young student. >> everyone needs to read that letter. it is shocking. >> alexis, are you here? you want to come up here? come on. don't be shy, nobody's going to bite. >> let's give her some encouragement here. we've heard from adults all day long, we want to hear from somebody who is -- come over here, young lady. my name is cheryl, thank you for being here. we have some great guests who care about you, everybody in this room cares about you. you have been through some training. you have a question for our guests? >> no, but i want to thank you for doing this. thank you. without this we'd be back at
. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of 12,000 loans worth $4.2 billion. in 2009, the sba approved $500 million in lending. next, we have the executive director of the san francisco small business office. she was in san francisco in 1986 to open the buffalo exchange limited store, and in the 13 years she worked for buffalo exchange, tennis district manager, she held her open the company from four to 11 stores. in 2009, the mayor appointed her as executive director to the office of small businesses. next, we have the ceo of opportunity funds. he has combined his background as a community organizer with an education from stanford to develop an innovative, not-for- profit financial incision that uses market principles to affect systemic change. it operates one of the nation's largest individual development, programs, a leading pro
. for us, the capacity for us to do the smaller side is not there as much as it is for them. on getting a loan through my side of the bank, i do not require an account to do that. we would like to have it, but i do not require it. >> last question for the opportunity fund and a critic representative. are you a cdfi? is san francisco and s.p.a. in support of cdfi's being established in san francisco? >> yes, we are. we were founded in 1999 with a small business loan. that is how we started our tenderloin office. >> opportunity fund is a certified cdfi, so we are providing a benefit to low and moderate-income communities. he is the city establishing support for new cdfi's? >> mark wanted to address that, in support of cdfi's in the city. >> we have a wealth of partners in the city. s.p.a. is just now rolling out a program for r -- will be the case by the summer. let me get one last point and on the question about relationships to lenders. the question was, do have to have an account with a bank in order to get a loan? may answer is no, but the real answer to it is certainly want to do tha
are proud to reinvent ourselves and use our ability to make it all better. i would like to thank the mta with their vision and the blue green way on cargo lane and of course last but not least the park of rec and park and without them we wouldn't be here today having this great celebration and i hope you come back with your dogs, with your families and picnic and enjoy yourself very much so thank you again. [applause] >> thank you monique. thank you for those acknowledgments of the port and staff involved in this project but we want to ask a couple of key partners to speak on these project and their participation and particularly the parks and recreation department, the key partner with the port. as monique mentioned in 2008 they lead a campaign to get $185 million of park bonds, a portion was made available to the port and used for the blue green way projects. that partnership has lead to ongoing partnerships specifically to the eco center and like the mayor said we are working together in 2012 to get will additional park bonds and with they would like to introduce phil ginsburg dire
in libya and jogged through the ruins. but, as we said, chris always came home and entertained us when he did. i worked hard to sharpen tennis and skiiing skills. i was proud the year chris said you ski faster than the master. [ laughter] >> we got up early to be the first on the ski lift. at my wedding he said he would be happy by to perform a libyan liberation dance to celebrate the success of the revolution. [ laughter] >> he inspired me to travel and work inter nationally. i filled out an application for the peace corp. during my senior year because he had. he taught english in morocco. i taught math. we talked about the joys of living and working over seas. we spoke french together. later he helped me get an assignment with a pediatric a.i.d.s. group. now i work in a county hospital in stockton caring for patients from all over the world. like chris, i am genuinely interested in listening to their stories and learning about their lives. i was really hoping he would still be here. i dreamt of someday working as a detector in a country where he was ambassador. i was looking forward to
tomorrow's victims. that is painting with a very broad brush, but it's something that encourages us to take action. i think in my prosecutors office there is hard and soft power. the hard power in a prosecutor's office, in a police department, it's arresting. it's putting in jail. it's going in court and find this person guilty and punish them. that's a kind of hard power and most of what is done in a prosecutor's office -- most of the resources are devoted to those hard power tasks, but although we devote less resources to soft power there are probably more important and soft power is where you change the hearts and minds of people. where you try to change cultures, try to change the norms in the community are and certainly in our office we devote significant resources to this. just a couple of examples. we have something called the parent project, and i am very grateful in a time of really reduced funding our board of supervisors stepped up and provided funding for otherwise what was run on a shoe string out of our office, and it's a program that teaches parents to be better
of using profanity but because it was a different lapd. it was rumored that the mexican mafia was allowed to meet in his church and that he held guns for gang members. and he was helping gang members across the border. i am certain he knew where the body of jimmy hoffa was buried when you got done listening to the rumors. now, the lapd uses home with industries as an integral part of its anti-gang efforts. not all of them, not 9000 members, but i can tell you this, homeboy industries have their annual benefit to honor people in the community as well as former gang members, the person they honored was chief charlie of the lapd. unless you think that was an anomaly, the year before they honored the sheriff. there is an alliance between community-based organizations, and law-enforcement. this is not enough. there has also been in the streets, ongoing, a relationship, a delicate one, a thoughtful one between the loss angeles police department and gang intervention. interventionists are former gang members. they have to be very careful about how they play out the relationship. they do not want
this before. it is a large issuance particularly for us because we never issued bonds before. $350 million in bonds is considerable for even some of our members. and it's been a unique opportunity to work with the bankers and attorneys and all the people that get involved because it's different for them. it's not a vanilla, you've done it before kind of issuance. so, it's been interesting, we've done some creative things. one of the things i'll be interested in sharing with your staff is how we propose to set the surcharge to collect the revenue to pay the debt service. it's somewhat unique. it reminds me of the conversation we had with todd a couple of years ago, but it's a twist that may help stabilize revenue and make everyone feel good, which is a challenge. stabilizing revenue is important for the bond buyers making them feel good is keeping peace within the ranks of our members. we're also working closely with your staff, gathering information, exchanging information on how the billing might be done and so forth. all that's going well. we met with one of the bond rating agencies yest
initially there were only about 5% of us that were hispanic in the school and wouldn't be the case if 95% are hispanic and english speaking as a second language, but i think the way that we can deal with the issue is we ought to first of all start with the notion of respect for others, and respect for others can work across the line. it doesn't necessarily mean -- it doesn'tly has to deal with the culture. is how we treat one another? and i think we have to be very clear in our educational process and the communication to our people and what is acceptable behavior and what is unacceptable behavior, and i am often fearful when we try to develop a black letter law if you have all these factors and bullying and you fell outside and that works okay in the courtroom. right? as prosecutors we need clear understanding of the laws to understand whether we have a criminal violation or not, but i am fearful we maybe overly legalistic and the way we deal with on a daily basis and we need to approach this by a global perspective respecting people and understanding we have the same rights and obl
is obvious. both of us were incapable of sleeping at a normal hour, night owls. i would have on my news feed and my cat box will open and one of the humorious remarks would come on the screen and i would just giggle and this leads to the next similarity and that being a beautiful dry whit, and whole some ability at laughing at laugh and the one liner that says it all. i am carefully cultivating my own sense of humor and i hope to make as many laugh as my uncle did you all and the one similarity i hope that we possess and if not i will create it as my uncle did is inherent sense of kindness and make anyone feel at ease and boundless ability of compassion and that beauty only is in a few souls and my uncle possessed many more qualities and too numerous here but i remember him as someone i would to be friends with and strive to be like more and more everyday. [applause] >> now milton's friends and colleague gia danler. >> milton and i met in early 1998 as fellow participants in a leadership development program and recently before started in san francisco by the jewish community relation
constructive steps to remove the barriers. the ada gives us some guidance on that. readily achievable says it can be done quickly and easily without a whole lot of steps. feasible means that it may require a lot more money, a lot more alteration to get that done. under the ada, you need to be surveying your property and putting together both a short- term plan and a long-term plan. the short term plan is going to be the readily achievable solution. the long-term plan could take 20 years. i do not know. your business might not be making huge profits. you may need to be saving money for the long term. but it is your obligation to plan for the long term as well as the short term. the ada has a set of priorities that guide you on how you will be serving your property. the ada says a certain party of getting in the front door, but you are logical, you want your customers to access your services. be that steps, be that ramps, if the door is not wide enough, if the landing is not level enough. priority two is actually travel. once you get into your business and start speculating the wits of your
which is probably when we would most likely need to buy this stuff, it gives us some price flexibility there. >> right. to the extent that we are low on hydro -- california is low on hydro, and, so, market prices are going to be up overall as a result. >> thank you. >> what is the impact of the deductions on solar utilization? have we measured that? tax deductions that are -- >> have we measured that? we certainly realize that it lowers the cost. >> right. >> and that's why we pursued a third-party for our development of the sunset solar project. >> okay. >> and didn't fund it ourselves. i can't recall off the top of my head, maybe you do, todd, what the -- mr. reedstrom, what the financial impact of that was for us. >> it was pretty significant. by way of comparison, the tax credit, tax credit financing that we successfully undertook for current sunset solar brought the average cost per kilowatt hour down to 23-1/2 cents. that compares to average costs of our hydro system. all the costs included of about 9 cents. so, without the tax
the accrediting commission is telling us to do. he had been right. what does it tell you about a man who after brain surgery and many treatments kept coming to meetings. he kept showing up to meetings because he wanted to fix the college. he wanted to right a ship. what does it tell you about a man who i had the pleasure of driving home in his last several months? and i said "milton are you really going to run again?" and he said "yes" and i said "good" and we have work to do. we still have work to do". that tells me he's not just a good man and a good servant. it tells me he was a great human being. that's what that tells me about milton marks. milton has passed, but long will live his legacy of public service of courage, of accountability, of restoring and believing in what it means to have public trust in your institutions, why that is so important. he was a great mentor, and i couldn't have imagined or thought of anyone better to sit next to in my first years in public office. he taught me how to be a public servant and human being and most importantly how to be a good father and a
just grew up together. there were no handouts and no one told us how to conduct ourselves. and tell us what to wear. someone could have a school fight, and we may be at the mall, and see the person we have a fight with. the army and navy have their bar fights. i did not see this as being a game, or a community. supporting each other, this may have been in a negative way. i did not have a stable household. many of them do not of their fathers are, where their father is dead. in their return, the block i gave up -- this is who i looked up to. he had a notorious reputation. there was the violence and in return, we had the pros and cons for that. a lot of people would mess with me because of who my father was -- to my brother was. they became my enemies. it was not a choice. this is just how was. let's go get him. and it comes to the place, you get tired of running. i did not see this as being wrong. what people defined as a gang, that must be a gang member right there. i have tattoos on my arm and neck and hand, and none of them are getting associated. they all tell personal story in my l
. or for any athletic field, call 831-5510. you can write us at -- or walk in and say hello. and of course you can find more information moresfrecpark.org. --
meltzer, steve dixon, and jack hirsch man. >> you can black as out of the press, blog and arrest us, tear gas, mace, and shoot us, as we know very well, you will, but this time we're not turning back. we know you are finished. desperate, near the end. hysterical in your flabbergastlyness. amen. >> after the readings, the crowd headed to a reception upstairs by wandering through the other gallery rooms in the historic home. the third floor is not usually reserved for just parties, however. it is the stage for live performances. ♪ under the guidance of musical curators, these three, meridian has maintained a strong commitment to new music, compositions that are innovative, experimental, and sometimes challenging. sound art is an artistic and event that usually receives short shrift from most galleries because san francisco is musicians have responded by showing strong support for the programming. ♪ looking into meridian's future, she says she wants to keep doing the same thing that she has been doing since 1989. to enlighten and disturbed. >> i really believe that all the arts have a se
francisco. it's interesting for those of us in the pioneer park project is trying to make the point that not only the tower, not only this man-built edifice here is a symbol of the city but also the green space on which it sits and the hill to which is rests. to understand them, you have to understand the topography of san francisco. early days of the city, the city grows up in what is the financial district on the edge of chinatown. everything they rely on for existence is the golden gate. it's of massive importance to the people what comes in and out of san francisco bay. they can't see it where they are. they get the idea to build a giant wooden structure. the years that it was up here, it gave the name telegraph hill. it survived although the structure is long gone. come to the 1870's and the city has growed up remarkably. it's fueled with money from the nevada silver mines and the gold rush. it's trying to be the paris of the west. now the beach is the suburbs, the we will their people lived on the bottom and the poorest people lived on the top because it was very hard getting
. i am done. that was his turning point. call it a turning point, called the teachable moment. use whatever terminology that you want. that is where we need to be present. when i say we, i mean, we. at that turning point, at that moment of truth, that teachable moment, it is imperative that resources be brought to bear. now, what are the two most impressive resources that are brought to bear at that moment. there are two major forces that helped gang members change.
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